Point of View (Part I) – First, Second, and Third Person — Video + Worksheet


Point of View,
Part I, video and worksheet. In this video you’re
going to learn about different points of
view, including first person, second person, and third
person point of view. While you listen to the
video, use the worksheet to take notes and practice. So what is point of view? Point of view is the
perspective or eyes a story is told from. So for example, here
is our narrator. The narrator is the person
who tells the story. The area shown in blue is
the narrator’s point of view. The point of view
includes everything that the narrator sees
from the angle of her eyes. Let’s look at another
point of view. Here’s a child who wants to
play with the other children. His point of view
is shown in green. He sees the same
things as the girl, but if he’s the narrator,
the story will be a little different
because his point of view is a little different from hers. Here’s one more
interesting point of view, the point of view of
a bird in the sky, and again, even though the bird is looking at the same things
as the girl and boy narrators, his point of view is totally
different from theirs. Now let’s look at
three narrators that show us the different
types of point of view. There’s narrator one, narrator
two, and narrator three. Narrator one says, I was sad. I felt nervous. I didn’t want to tell my mom that I broke the
window in my room. Look how his words are different from the words of narrator two. You were sad. You felt nervous. You didn’t want to tell your mom that you broke the
window in your room. And then let’s look at how
both of these narrators differ from narrator three. He was said. He felt nervous. He didn’t want to tell his mom that he broke the
window in his room. What are the major differences in narrators one,
two, and three? One major difference
is that narrator one uses first person
pronouns like I and my. Narrator two uses second
person pronouns, you and your. And narrator three uses third
person pronouns, he and his. Narrator one uses the
first person point of view. That means narrator one is
actually talking about himself, not only other characters. Narrator two uses what we call the second person point of view. Narrator two is talking
directly to the reader using the pronoun you. Narrator number three is using the third person point of view, talking about other
people in the story. So the three main
types of point of view are first person point of view, second person point of view,
and third person point of view. So let’s put what we’ve
learned into a table. First person point of
view uses pronouns I, my, we, our, me, and us. For example, I was
sad; I felt nervous. The narrator speaks
about himself or herself. This means that the
narrator is usually also the main
character of the story. In second person point of view, the narrator uses
pronouns you and your. For example, you were
sad; you felt nervous. The narrator speaks
directly to the reader. Remember that second
person point of view is rarely used in stories. And finally, third
person point of view uses third person
pronouns like he, she, it, they, his, her, and their. In third person point of view, the narrator watches the
story but is not in the story. So our narrator says he
looked sad; he seemed nervous. Notice he’s talking
about a boy he sees, but he’s not talking to the boy, and he’s not interacting
with the boy. That’s because this narrator
is not in the story. He’s just watching the story
and telling us about it. Third person point
of view narrators speak about other characters
but not himself or herself. Most stories use
this point of view. Also note that there
are different types of third person point of view. In this video, I won’t teach
about the different types. To learn about those, watch
Point of View Video Part II. Now let’s practice
what we’ve learned about first, second, and
third person point of view. Practice number one,
these words are taken from Hoot, chapter
one, by Carl Hiaasen: “Being the new kid,
Roy always sat alone, “at the end of the
table, whenever he
was in the cafeteria. “Roy was an old pro
at being the new kid. “Trace Middle was
the sixth school “he had attended since he
started going to school. “Coconut Cove was the tenth town “his family had lived in
since Roy could remember.” Question one, the point of
view is, A, first person, B, second person,
or C, third person. Question two, how do you know? For question one, just
circle the correct answer. For question two, you can
refer back to the chart that we completed right
before these questions. Record your answers, and pause
the video while you work. We’ll check all the
answers in just a moment. Practice number two;
these words are taken from If on a Winter’s
Night a Traveler, chapter one, by Italo Calvino. “Well, what are you waiting for? “Stretch your legs, go
ahead and put your feet “on a cushion, on two
cushions, on the arms “of a sofa, on the
wings of a chair. “Take your shoes off first. “If you want to, put your feet
up; if not, put them back.” Question one, the point of
view is, A, first person, B, second person,
or C, third person. Question two, how do you know? Pause the video while
you answer the questions, and we’ll check
them in a moment. Practice number three. These words are
taken from the story The Girl with No Past, chapter
four, by Kathryn Croft. “I wanted to tell her that I
was happy with how I lived. “My actions didn’t affect
or hurt anyone around me, “and I was free in a way
she could never understand. “But I was beginning
to doubt this myself. “When our time was up, I
shook Dr. Redfield’s hand, “promising to keep my
appointment next month.” Question one, the point of
view is A, first person, B, second person,
or C, third person. Question two, how
do you know that? Pause the video while you work, and we’ll check the
answers in a moment. Practice number four. These words are
taken from the story Guardians of Ga’Hoole,
chapter 11, by Kathryn Lasky. “The two little owls
looked at each other “and moved their beaks,
turning the sound “of their numbers into something “that might pass for a name,
any name but their own. “And now, tonight, they
would try the second part “of their strategy
for the first time.” Question one, the point of
view is A, first person, B, second person,
or C, third person. Question two, how
do you know that? Pause the video while you work, and we’ll check the
answers in a moment. Now let’s check our answers. Practice number
one, question one. The point of view
is third person. How do we know that? Because the narrator uses third
person pronouns he and his. They’re underlined here. Also, the narrator
watches the story but is not in the story. We know he’s watching the story because he’s talking
about the new kid Roy. The narrator says,
“Being the new kid, “Roy always sat alone,
at the end of the table, “whenever he was
in the cafeteria.” But we know the narrator
isn’t in the story because he isn’t talking to Roy, he isn’t in the
cafeteria with Roy. He’s just telling
the reader about Roy. Finally, the narrator tells
about other characters but not himself, so
he’s observing Roy and he’s telling about
Roy, but he’s telling us nothing about himself. When a narrator does that, the point of view
is third person. Practice number
two, question one. The point of view
is second person. Question two, how
do you know that? First, the narrator uses second person
pronouns you and your. Here they are. And secondly, the
narrator speaks directly to the reader using
these pronouns. So in the first sentence
where the narrator says, “Well, what are you waiting for? “Stretch your legs,
go ahead put your feet “on a cushion, on two cushions.” In these sentences,
see how the narrator uses the words you and your? That’s because the
narrator is speaking directly to the person
reading the story. That means the narrator
is speaking to you and me. When the narrator speaks
directly to the reader, we know that the
narrator is using second person point of view. Practice number
three, question one. The point of view
is first person. Question two, how
do you know that? We know because the narrator
uses first person pronouns, like I and my. Here they are. Let’s re-read her words. “I wanted to tell her that I
was happy with how I lived. “My actions didn’t affect
or hurt anyone around me.” The narrator uses those pronouns because the narrator’s
speaking about herself. This tells us that the
narrator is the main character in the story. When the narrator talks
about him or her self using the pronouns I, my, and
other first person pronouns, and the narrator’s
the main character, that means that the
narrator is using first person point of view. Practice number
four, question one. The point of view
is third person. Question two, how
do you know that? We know that
because the narrator uses third person
pronouns they and their. The narrator uses
these pronouns to tell about the characters, the owls. The narrator says,
“The two little owls “looked at each other
and moved their beaks, “turning the sound
of their numbers “into something that
might pass for a name.” Here, the narrator
is watching the owls and telling the reader
what the owls are doing. But the narrator isn’t
talking to the owls or interacting with the owls. The narrator isn’t in
the action of the story. He’s just telling us
the action of the story. Finally, the narrator tells
about other characters but not about himself. When the narrator is
watching the story and not in it, and talking
about other characters but not himself using
third person pronouns, that means that
the narrator uses third person point of view. The end. Our lesson on point
of view is complete. I hope this video
helped you understand what point of view is
and how to identify each point of view. Watch Point of View Par II
to learn the different types of third person point of view.

14 Replies to “Point of View (Part I) – First, Second, and Third Person — Video + Worksheet

  1. After watching many videos finally I found meaningful and very well explained video thank you so much for this video mam.

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